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Yeast Bread

Here are our recipes for Corn (yeast) . Molasses Fennel Rye . Italian French Stick breads.

The corn and molasses fennel rye breads can be baked on the same day that they are mixed. However, the Italian French Stick is started on the evening before baking. Note that the rise time for any yeasted bread will vary depending on the temperature in the kitchen. If the kitchen is cold, put the rising dough into the oven with only the light turned on. If the kitchen is warm as it is in summer, let the dough rise on the counter. The slower rise time greatly improves the flavour, lending a nutty quality. The resulting bread also seems to be much less inclined to go moldy, even though there are no added preservatives. Please note also that NO sugar is called for in the Italian French Stick.

Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Whole Grain Bread:
Molasses Fennel . more bread recipes

Molasses Fennel Rye Bread

molasses fennel bread (photo ejm Oct2006)revised November 2002; and again December 2003

This is the very first kind of yeast bread I made. I got the recipe from the fabulous Clark's by the Bay Restaurant (now sadly closed) near Kingston, Ontario - although a rumour has been confirmed that he has opened another restaurant in Kingston itself.

Ingredients

Preparation

  1. In a smallish bowl, mix yeast with ¼ c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and set aside til creamy. (Or if you think the yeast may not be viable, until the mixture starts to bubble. Put the bowl into the *cold oven (with the light turned on if you want)* with the door closed. Let it sit there as you start to make the bread dough. It sometimes takes more than 10 minutes to start foaming.
  2. Meanwhile, in a bowl large enough for the dough to double, pour the rest of the water. Stir in sugar and molasses. (If the molasses is stiff because of a chilly kitchen, use warm water instead of room temperature) Add fennel seeds and ground ginger. Dump in flours and wheat germ and stir with a wooden spoon until the flour is mostly absorbed.
  3. Add the yeast mixture (it should be quite foamy - if it is not after a period of 20 minutes have passed, either the yeast is dead or the water was too hot or far too cold. Check the due date on your yeast container. If the date hasn't passed, try again.) stir to form a rough dough. Cover the bowl with plastic and let sit on the counter for about 20 minutes.
  4. Put some of the ½ c flour for kneading on a wooden board. Turn the dough out onto the board. Sprinkle the salt overtop the dough. Wash and dry the mixing bowl. Hand knead the dough 10 to 15 minutes, adding small amounts of additional flour if dough is sticky. When the dough is springy and silky to the touch, knead in raisins. Form the dough into a ball and put it in the clean bowl; cover it with a damp cloth (or plastic wrap); let rise in a no draught place at room temperature (or in the cold oven with the light turned on if you want) for about an hour, until it has doubled in size. Gently deflate dough. Recover with a damp cloth and allow to rise until doubled again.
  5. Gently turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board; cut it in half with a dough scraper if you have one, with a knife if you don't.
  6. Shape into two round balls and place them (not touching) on a lightly oiled pan or a cornmeal dusted peel or on parchment paper. Dust the tops with flour. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise until double in size. (about an hour)
  7. Thirty minutes before you are going to bake, turn oven to 400F. Put water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven.
  8. If you want, slash the top of the balls with a very sharp knife. Liberally spray the tops with water. Put bread in oven and immediately turn the oven down to 350F. Bake the bread on the second lowest rack for 35-40 (I bake it for 45-50) minutes or until it is hollow sounding on the bottom.round slashes
  9. Remove to cool upended on cooling racks. Wait til the bread is cool before cutting it. If you like to eat warm bread, reheat the bread after it has cooled.

This is not a particularly sweet bread and is excellent with soup and/or salad. It's wonderful with cheddar cheese. It also goes very well with Baked Beans or thinly sliced and spread with Roasted Red Pepper Pâté as a festive appetizer.

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to pre Christmas Feast Menu 2003
Clark's original recipe
blog from OUR kitchen: Molasses Fennel Rye Bread from Memory Lane (BBB September 2012) << recipe revised in 2012 to include weight measures
Back to our recipes

Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Rustic Bread:
French Stick . more bread recipes

Bread goes well with:
Garlic Rosemary Chicken . Mediterranean Chicken . Chicken and Cranberries in Dark Beer . Haricots Blancs . Baked Beans . Cassoulet . Soupe de Poisson . Fish Soup with Aioli . Eggplant Pepper Antipasto . Salads

Italian dishes:
Basil Pesto . Borlotti (Cranberry Beans) Pasta Sauce . Eggplant Pepper Antipasto (hot) . Eggplant Antipasto . Eggplant Lasagne . Focaccia . Fresh Pasta . Manicotti . Pan Bigio (bread) . Pane Francese (bread) . Pasta with Hot Chillies & Broccoli . Pasta with Hot Chillies & Tomatoes . Pasta with Nettles & Cream Sauce . Pizza . Spaghettini with mint pesto . Tomato Sauce . Torta Verde (Spinach Pie)

Italian French Stick Bread

adapted from recipe for Starter Dough Method Italian Pane Francese in The Village Baker by Joe Ortiz and various recipes in The Italian Baker by Carol Field

Ingredients

Starter Dough

Bread

Preparation

Starter Dough

  1. In a small bowl, mix the yeast in the lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and make sure that it bubbles (about 10 minutes).
  2. In a bowl large enough for the starter dough (aka Starter Dough) to triple, add the flour a half a cup at a time mixing it in well with a wooden spoon. When the ingredients have been thoroughly combined, the Starter Dough will be quite soupy. Let the Starter Dough rise, covered, in a no-draught spot on the counter for 8 to 10 hours.

Bread

  1. To make the dough, add ½ cup of flour to the Starter Dough. Stir with a wooden spoon. Continue to add all but ½ cup of the remaining flour, ½ cup at a time, stirring all the time. To make a more rustic bread, use ½ c whole wheat flour and 1½ c white flour. You don't have to add all the flour. You know it's enough when the dough comes away from the side of the bowl. It will still be quite sticky.
  2. Dust the board with some of the last ½ c flour and then scrape the dough out of the bowl. Sprinkle salt over top. Use the extra flour to help you handle the wet dough. Using a dough scraper, knead the dough for 10 to 15 minutes until it is smooth and silky. Scrape away any dough that is on the board. As you knead, add flour a very little at a time to stop it from sticking. The dough will still be quite loose.
  3. Put the dough in a lightly floured bowl. Cover with a damp towel and let rise in a no-draught place for 1 to 1½ hours. When the dough has doubled, deflate the dough and turn it out onto the board. Divide it in two equal pieces. Shape into rectangles and roll like jelly rolls to make 2 baguettes. Put them on a baking pan that has cornmeal sprinkled on the bottom of the pan. Wet your hands well and rub the dough. Sprinkle sesame seeds over each baguette. Cover with plastic wrap then a damp towel and let rise again to almost double (about 45 minutes).
  4. Thirty minutes before you are going to bake, turn oven to 500F. Put water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven.
  5. baguette slashesSlash the top of the baguettes with a very sharp knife at an almost horizontal angle. Spray the baguettes liberally with water. Put bread in oven and immediately turn the oven down to 450F. Bake the bread on the second lowest rack for 30 minutes or until it is hollow sounding on the bottom.
  6. Turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool upended on cooling racks. Wait til the bread is cool before cutting it.

The broiling pan of water in the oven is to create steam at the beginning of the baking time to make very crusty bread.

Uneaten bread should be stored at room temperature rather than refrigerated. (the refrigerator causes the bread to go stale faster) Bread can also be stored in the freezer - double bagged airtight plastic. Take it out of the freezer and leave it in the bag until the bread has thawed. To reheat the bread, turn the oven to 500F for 5 minutes or so. Turn the oven OFF. Put the bread in the oven for ten minutes.

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to Christmas Eve Menu 1997
to Christmas Eve Menu 1999

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Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Whole Grain Bread:
Corn (yeast) . more bread recipes

Stovetop Dressing . quick (no yeast) corn bread

Corn Bread

corn bread (photo ejm Oct2006) revised 21/09/2002

Ingredients

Preparation

  1. Put the cornmeal (coarsely ground meal from dried corn, aka maize) and oil into a large mixing bowl. Add the boiling water and stir well. Set aside to cool until just warm.
  2. In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in ¼ c of lukewarm water (I added about 1 tsp of honey). Stir the dissolved yeast into the cooled cornmeal mixture and blend well. Stir in ½ c water and add all but ½ c of the all-purpose flour, blending well to form a dough. You don't have to add all the flour. You know it's enough when the dough comes away from the side of the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and let sit on the counter for about 20 minutes.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured board (use some of the last ½ c of flour). Sprinkle the salt overtop the dough. Wash and dry the mixing bowl. Adding as little extra flour as possible, knead for 10 or 15 minutes. The dough may be rather sticky. If necessary, sprinkle a little flour to form dough into a ball. Put it in the clean bowl; cover it with a damp cloth; let rise in a no draught place for about an hour, until it has doubled in size. Then, deflate dough, knead for about 5 minutes. Return it to bowl, cover it, let it rise until doubled again. Knead once more for a minute or two. Form the dough into one long log (or two small ones). Place on a cornmealed pan. Cover and let rise for about 40 minutes or until doubled in size.
  4. Thirty minutes before you are going to bake, turn oven to 400F. Put water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven.
    baguette slashes
  5. Optional step: Slash the top(s) with a very sharp knife at an almost horizontal angle. Do this only if the bread has risen to almost half. If it has risen higher, the bread has a tendency to fall if slashed.
  6. Spray the bread liberally with water. Bake the bread on the second lowest rack at 350F for 45 to 50 minutes or until it is hollow sounding on the bottom.
  7. Turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool on cooling racks. Wait til the bread is cool before cutting it.

adapted from SUNDAYS AT MOOSEWOOD RESTAURANT
by the Moosewood Collective
published by Simon&Schuster/Fireside 1990

If there is any bread left the next day, it makes terrific Stovetop Dressing. There is also a quick (no yeast) cornbread recipe. It is also excellent sliced thinly and grilled on the barbecue. Spray the grilled bread with olive oil and lay grilled meat on top.

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Whole Grain Breads:
Corn (yeast) . Molasses Fennel . Multigrain . Pita . Rustic French . Sandwich Bread or Hamburger Buns . 100% Whole Wheat

Rustic Bread:
Boule . Couronne . French Stick . Italian Country . Rustic French

Other breads:
Flatbreads . Quickbreads, Biscuits and Muffins . Yeast breads




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ejm (aka llizard) 2000-2004
Toronto Ontario Canada

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