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Rustic Yeast Bread

Here are our recipes for French-Style Boule . French-Style Couronne . French-Style Wholegrain . Italian-Style Wholegrain

These bread recipes are all started on the evening before baking. Note that the rise time for any yeasted bread will vary depending on the temperature in the kitchen. If the kitchen is cold, put the rising dough into the oven with only the light turned on. If the kitchen is warm as it is in summer, let the dough rise on the counter. The slower rise time greatly improves the flavour, lending a nutty quality. The resulting bread also seems to be much less inclined to go moldy, even though there are no added preservatives. Please note also that NO sugar is called for in any of these recipes.

Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Rustic Wholegrain French-Style

revised January 2003

based on a recipe entitled "Pain de compagne sur poolish" in The Village Baker by Joe Ortiz, published by Ten Speed Press

Ingredients

Starter Dough:

Dough:

Preparation

Starter Dough
  1. On the night before you are going to make bread, in a small bowl, mix the yeast in the lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and make sure that it bubbles (about 10 minutes).
  2. In a bowl large enough for the Starter Dough to triple, stir together the 3 types of flour with a wooden spoon. Add the water and the yeasted water and stir well until it has the consistency of pancake batter.
  3. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let the Starter Dough rise in a no-draught cool room for 6 to 8 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.
Dough
  1. In a small bowl, mix the yeast in ¼ c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and make sure that it bubbles (about 10 minutes).
  2. Add the rest of the water to the Starter Dough bowl (if the Starter Dough has been refrigerated, allow to sit at room temperature for about an hour before starting) and mix well. Let your hands be your friends by squeezing the dough between your fingers.
  3. Put all but ½ c of the flour into a large mixing bowl (enough for the final dough to triple in volume. Add the starter dough and water. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until there are no dry bits of flour left and a rough dough has formed. Cover with plastic and allow to rest for 20 to 30 minutes.
  4. Scatter some of the remaining flour on a flat surface (wooden board) for kneading. Turn the dough out onto the board. Sprinkle the salt over the dough which should be rather slack. (It should look a bit like porridge.)
  5. Wash and dry the bowl. (Please do not be tempted to skip this step.)
  6. Knead the dough for 10 to 15 minutes, using a dough scraper (spatula if you don't have one). Add a little flour but don't be afraid to get one hand covered in dough. (The clean hand is manipulating the dough scraper.) The dough should be quite moist. Keep kneading until the dough is smooth and pulls easily away from your hand and the board.
  7. Place dough in the clean dry mixing bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a no-draught spot on the counter for 20 minutes. Lightly sprinkle the board with flour (there might still be some remaining from that half cup; otherwise use a little more) and gently turn the dough out, trying not to disturb any bubbles. Fold the left side into the center, then the top, then the right side then the bottom. Turn the dough over and fold in half once more. Place it back in the bowl smooth side up. Cover with plastic. Let it ferment at room temperature for 20 minutes again. Repeat this step twice. (This step is done at 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 60 minutes after the first kneading.) After the final step, let the dough rise undisturbed in the no-draught spot on the counter til doubled - about 1 to 2 hours depending on the room temperature.
  8. When dough has doubled, gently turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Flatten it gently (try not to disturb the bubbles); fold the outer edges to the middle. Repeat by folding dough 4 or 5 times until you have formed a round. Place on a parchment covered baking tray - or peel if you have one. Sprinkle flour liberally over the loaf. Cover with plastic and allow to rise for about 1 hour til almost double. To test, flour your finger and press gently on the edge - it should very slowly spring back. For comparison, try pressing early on to see how it quickly springs back when the dough has not risen enough.
  9. Half an hour before you will be baking the bread, place baking stone on the second shelf from the bottom of the oven and turn oven to 450F. Put water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven. If you don't have a baking stone, it's still a good idea to preheat the oven for a substantial amount of time.
    round slashes
  10. Optional step: Just before baking, slash the top of loaf with a very sharp knife at a perpendicular angle. Do this only if the bread has risen to almost half. If it has risen higher, the bread has a tendency to fall if slashed.
  11. Spray the bread liberally with water. Place bread in oven and immediately turn oven down to 400F; bake the loaf for 50-60 minutes until hollow sounding on the bottom. It's a good idea to turn the bread after about 20 minutes of baking to allow for uneven heat in the oven. Remove parchment paper at the same time if you are using a stone.
  12. Turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool upended on cooling rack. Wait til the bread is cool before cutting it. If you wish to serve warm bread, reheat it after it has cooled completely.
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Mediterranean Chicken . Chicken and Cranberries in Dark Beer . Haricots Blancs . Cassoulet . Soupe de Poisson . Fish Soup with Aioli . Grilled Kalamari . Salads

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Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Breads: Boule . more bread recipes

Rustic Boule

makes 1 large boule or 2 medium sized boules

Rustic Boules (10 Mar 2006) adapted from the recipe for Acme's Rustic Baguettes in Artisan Baking Across America by Maggie Glezer

revised October 2003


Start making this the evening before you plan to bake the bread...

Ingredients

Scrap Dough: Poolish:
Actual Dough:

Preparation

Scrap Dough

  1. Mixing: On the evening before you plan to bake the bread: In a small glass bowl, mix the yeast in ½ c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and let sit til it's creamy.
  2. In a medium size bowl, mix flour, salt and 1/3 c of the yeasted water (reserve the extra for the Poolish).
  3. Kneading and Fermenting: Without adding extra flour, knead until smooth (about 5 minutes). Cover the scrap dough tightly with plastic. Leave to ferment at room temperature for about 3 hours, then refrigerate until the next morning. (If your kitchen temperature is cool, leave it on the countertop in a draught-free area.)

Poolish

  1. Mixing: On the same evening before you plan to bake the bread: Put the flour in another medium size bowl.
  2. Add 1 Tbsp of the yeasted water from the Scrap Dough ingredients to 2/3 c lukewarm water and beat. This will be quite sloppy.
  3. Fermenting: Cover with plastic and ferment on countertop in a draught-free area until the next morning.

Actual Dough

  1. Mixing: In the morning of the day you plan to bake the bread: In a small glass bowl, mix the yeast in 2 Tbsp lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and make sure that it bubbles (about 10 minutes).
  2. Put the flour in a large bowl.
  3. Pour the water into the fermented Poolish and stir it around a bit. Along with the yeasted water, pour the Poolish water into the large bowl with flour. Using a wooden spoon, mix until it is just combined. Knead it a few times to combine well. Cover with plastic and let it rest (Glezer uses the term "autolyse" for this) for about 20 minutes.
  4. Break the scrap dough up into smaller pieces. Add it with the salt to the rested dough. Turn the dough out of the bowl onto an unfloured work surface.
  5. Wash and dry the bowl
  6. Kneading: Without adding extra flour, knead the dough until it is silky (about 10 minutes). Let your dough scraper (a spatula works) be your friend if the dough is sticking to the board. If it feels at all stiff during mixing, add 1 or 2 Tbsp water. I've found that even after 15 minutes of squooshing the dough on the board, it still stays pretty sloppy and sticky even though most of it pulls away from the board.
  7. Proofing: Maneuvre the dough into the large bowl (should be large enough to allow the dough to expand by at least 3 times). Cover with plastic. Let it ferment at warm room temperature for 20 minutes.
  8. After 20 minutes has passed, very lightly sprinkle the work surface with flour. Carefully turn the dough out. If necessary, gently spread the dough out (try not to disturb any bubbles). Using the bread scraper and still trying not to disturb any bubbles, fold the sloppy left side into the center, then the top into the center, then the right side, then the bottom. As you lift it into the bowl, fold it in half once more. Try to place it in the bowl smooth side up. Cover with plastic.

    Let it ferment at room temperature for 20 minutes again. Repeat this step two more times. (This step is done at 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 60 minutes after the first kneading.) It's usually not until the third time that the dough will look like the smooth soft pillow that is described in books. The amount of dusting flour used in those three maneuvres is not more than a couple of tablespoons and probably much less (sorry, I've never actually measured).
  9. After those 20 minute sessions have passed, let the dough rise undisturbed for about 2 hours until it has doubled and is light and bubbly.
  10. Shaping: Sprinkle a tiny bit of flour on the work surface. Gently turn the dough out, disturbing it as little as possible. Lightly sprinkle the top of the dough with flour. If you are making two boules, cut the dough in half. Gently spread the dough out (try not to disturb the bubbles). Fold the left side into the center, then the top, then the right side then the bottom. Turn it over. Continue to fold it underneath itself to form an even tight ball without actually deflating the dough. Place it seam side down on a parchment covered peel. Sprinkle generously with flour. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for an hour or more - until the dough is about doubled. To test, flour your finger and press gently on the edge - it should very slowly spring back. For comparison, try pressing early on to see how it quickly springs back when the dough has not risen enough.
  11. Baking: Thirty minutes before you are going to bake, put the baking stone on the second from the bottom rack. Pour water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven. Turn oven to 475F.
  12. At the time of baking, spray the top of the boule liberally with water. Put the bread in oven and immediately turn the oven down to 425F. Bake the bread on the second lowest rack for 40 - 45 minutes or until it is hollow sounding on the bottom. Half way through the baking, remove the tray of water and turn the bread around to account for uneven heat in the oven.
  13. When the bread is done, turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool upended on cooling rack. Wait til the bread is completely cool before cutting it. If you want to eat warm bread, it is advisable to reheat the bread.

The broiling pan of water in the oven is to create steam at the beginning of the baking time to make very crusty bread.

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Eggplant Pepper Antipasto . Haricots Blancs . Baked Beans . Cassoulet . Chicken and Cranberries in Dark Beer . Garlic Rosemary Chicken . Mediterranean Chicken (or Fish) . Fish Soup with Aioli . Grilled Kalamari . Soupe de Poisson . Shrimps in Pernod . Salads

to Christmas Eve Menu 2002

to blog from OUR kitchen And we have oven spring! (baguette and boule recipe)

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Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Breads: Couronne . more bread recipes

Rustic Couronne

couronne double (photo mef 2005) makes 1 large double couronne or 2 medium sized single rings

adapted from the recipe for couronne - Pain de Compagne in the novel Bread Alone by Judith Ryan Hendricks

Start making this the evening before you plan to bake the bread...

Ingredients

Poolish: Actual Dough:

Preparation

Poolish

On the evening before you plan to bake the bread:
  1. Mixing: In a small glass bowl, mix ½ tsp yeast into ½ c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and let sit til it's creamy.
  2. Put the wholewheat flour into a medium sized bowl.
  3. Add the yeasted water to the flour and beat about 100 strokes. This mixture will be quite sloppy.
  4. Fermenting: Cover with plastic and ferment on countertop in a draught-free area until the next morning. (up to 8 hours)

Actual Dough

In the morning of the day you plan to bake the bread:
  1. Mixing: In a small glass bowl, put the yeast in ¼c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and mix together until it is creamy.
  2. Pour 2¼ c water into the fermented Poolish and stir it around a bit. Along with the yeasted water, pour the Poolish water into a large bowl. Add the flour. Using a wooden spoon, mix until it is just combined. Knead it a few times to combine well. Cover with plastic and let it rest for about 20 minutes.
  3. Turn the dough out of the bowl onto an unfloured work surface. Sprinkle the salt overtop the dough.
  4. Wash and dry the mixing bowl.
  5. Kneading: Without adding extra flour, knead the dough until it is smooth and silky (about 10 minutes). Let your dough scraper (a spatula works) be your friend if the dough is sticking to the board. I've found that even after 15 minutes of squooshing the dough on the board, it still stays pretty sloppy and sticky even though most of it pulls away from the board.
  6. Proofing: Maneuvre the dough into the large bowl (should be large enough to allow the dough to expand by at least 3 times). Cover with plastic. Let it ferment at room temperature for 20 minutes.
  7. After 20 minutes has passed, very lightly sprinkle the work surface with flour. Carefully turn the dough out. If necessary, gently spread the dough out (try not to disturb any bubbles). Using the bread scraper and still trying not to disturb any bubbles, fold the sloppy left side into the center, then the top into the center, then the right side, then the bottom. As you lift it into the bowl, fold it in half once more. Try to place it in the bowl smooth side up. Cover with plastic.

    Let it ferment at room temperature for 20 minutes again. Repeat this step two more times. (This step is done at 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 60 minutes after the first kneading.) It's usually not until the third time that the dough will look like the smooth soft pillow that is described in books. The amount of dusting flour used in those three maneuvres is not more than a couple of tablespoons and probably much less (sorry, I've never actually measured).
  8. After those 20 minute sessions have passed, let the dough rise undisturbed for about 2 hours until it has doubled and is light and bubbly.
  9. Shaping: Sprinkle a tiny bit of flour on the work surface. Gently turn the dough out, disturbing it as little as possible. Lightly sprinkle the top of the dough with flour. Cut the dough in half. Gently fold (try not to disturb the bubbles) the left side into the center, then the top, then the right side then the bottom. Turn it over. Continue to fold it underneath itself to form an even tight log without actually deflating the dough. Do the same with the other piece of dough. Place them seam side down to form ring shapes on a parchment covered peel. Before sealing the ends of each ring together, link the two rings together in chain fashion. Sprinkle generously with flour. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for an hour or more - until the dough is about doubled. To test, flour your finger and press gently on the edge - it should very slowly spring back. For comparison, try pressing early on to see how it quickly springs back when the dough has not risen enough.
  10. Baking: Thirty minutes before you are going to bake, put the baking stone on the second from the bottom rack. Pour water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven. Turn oven to 500F.
  11. At the time of baking, spray the top of the boule liberally with water. Put the bread in oven and immediately turn the oven down to 450F. Bake the bread on the middle rack for 10 minutes. Turn the oven down to 400F and continue baking for 25 to 30 minutes or until the internal temperature is between 200F and 210F (it should be hollow sounding on the bottom). Half way through the baking, remove the tray of water and turn the bread around to account for uneven heat in the oven. You may also want to turn the oven down one more notch at this time.
  12. When the bread is done, turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool upended on cooling rack. Wait til the bread is completely cool before cutting it. If you want to eat warm bread, it is advisable to reheat the bread.

The broiling pan of water in the oven is to create steam at the beginning of the baking time to make very crusty bread.

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blog from OUR kitchen - Thanksgiving 2005

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Gourmet Sleuth: Conversion & Ingredient Tables . Traditional Oven: Conversion of measures of ingredients calculator
metric weight equivalents for flour and water . Bread Making Notes


Breads: Italian Country . more bread recipes

Italian dishes:
Basil Pesto . Borlotti (Cranberry Beans) Pasta Sauce . Eggplant Pepper Antipasto (hot) . Eggplant Antipasto . Eggplant Lasagne . Focaccia . Fresh Pasta . Manicotti . Pan Bigio (bread) . Pane Francese (bread) . Pasta with Hot Chillies & Broccoli . Pasta with Hot Chillies & Tomatoes . Pasta with Nettles & Cream Sauce . Pizza . Spaghettini with mint pesto . Tomato Sauce . Torta Verde (Spinach Pie)

Rustic Wholegrain Italian-Style Pagnotta

based on a recipe entitled "Pan Bigio" in The Italian Baker by Carol Field, published by Harper Collins bread

Ingredients

Starter Dough (Biga):

Actual Dough:

Sometimes when we want a slightly more refined loaf, I use 1 cup whole wheat flour and 4¾ cups unbleached all-purpose flour in the actual dough.

Preparation

Starter Dough
  1. On the night before you are going to make bread, in a small bowl, mix the yeast in the lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and leave til creamy.
  2. In a medium sized bowl large enough for the Starter Dough to triple, stir together the yeasted water, water and flour with a wooden spoon. Knead a couple of times to make sure all the flour is encorporated.
  3. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let the Starter Dough rise in a no-draught cool room for 6 to 8 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.
Dough
  1. On the day you will be making the bread, in a small bowl, mix the yeast in ¼ c lukewarm water (do the baby's bottle test on your wrist) and make sure that it bubbles (about 10 minutes).
  2. Add the rest of the water to the Starter Dough bowl (if the Starter Dough has been refrigerated, allow to sit at room temperature for about an hour before starting) and mix well. Let your hands be your friends by squeezing the dough between your fingers.
  3. Put all the whole wheat flour and all but ½ c of the all purpose flour into a large mixing bowl (enough for the final dough to triple in volume. Add the starter dough and water. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until there are no dry bits of flour left and you have created a rough dough. Cover with plastic and allow to rest for 20 to 30 minutes.
  4. Scatter some of the remaining flour on a flat surface (wooden board) for kneading. Turn the dough out onto the board. Sprinkle the salt over the dough which will be rather slack. (It should look a bit like porridge.)
  5. Wash and dry the bowl. (Please do not be tempted to skip this step.)
  6. Knead the dough for about 15 minutes, using a dough scraper (spatula if you don't have one). Add a little flour but don't be afraid to get one hand covered in dough. (The clean hand is manipulating the dough scraper.) The dough should be quite moist. Keep kneading until the dough is smooth(ish) and pulls easily away from your hand and the board.
  7. Place dough in the clean dry mixing bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a no-draught spot on the counter for 20 minutes. Lightly sprinkle the board with flour (there might still be some remaining from that half cup; otherwise use a little more) and gently turn the dough out, trying not to disturb any bubbles. Fold the left side into the center, then the top, then the right side then the bottom. Turn the dough over and fold in half once more. Place it back in the bowl smooth side up. Cover with plastic. Let it ferment at room temperature for 20 minutes again. Repeat this step twice. (This step is done at 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 60 minutes after the first kneading.) After the final step, let the dough rise undisturbed in the no-draught spot on the counter til doubled - about 1 to 2 hours depending on the room temperature.
  8. When dough has doubled, gently turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Flatten it gently (try not to disturb the bubbles); fold the outer edges to the middle. Repeat by folding dough 4 or 5 times until you have formed a round. Place on a parchment covered baking tray - or peel if you have one. Sprinkle flour liberally over the loaf. Cover with plastic and allow to rise for about 1 hour til almost double. To test, flour your finger and press gently on the edge - it should very slowly spring back. For comparison, try pressing early on to see how it quickly springs back when the dough has not risen enough.
  9. Half an hour before you will be baking the bread, place baking stone on the second shelf from the bottom of the oven and turn oven to 500F. Put water into a broiling pan and place it on the bottom rack of the oven. If you don't have a baking stone, it's still a good idea to preheat the oven for a substantial amount of time.
  10. Just before baking, spray the top of the loaf with water.
  11. Place bread in oven and immediately turn oven down to 450F; bake the loaf for 45-50 minutes until hollow sounding on the bottom. It's a good idea to turn the bread after about 20 minutes of baking to allow for uneven heat in the oven. Remove parchment paper at the same time if you are using a stone.
  12. Turn off the oven. Put the finished bread back in the oven and leave with the door ajar for 5 or 10 minutes. Remove to cool on cooling rack. Wait til the bread is cool before cutting it. If you wish to serve warm bread, reheat it after it has cooled completely.
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Eggplant and Garlic Spread


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Corn (yeast) . Molasses Fennel . Multigrain . Pita . Rustic French . Sandwich Bread or Hamburger Buns . 100% Whole Wheat

Other breads:
Flatbreads . Quickbreads, Biscuits and Muffins . Yeast breads




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ejm (aka llizard) 2000-2003, 2006, 2007
Toronto Ontario Canada

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